Santa Claus Clebrations

Three Wise Men
Discover the story, myths and legends associated with the Three Wise Men. This festive tradition and Christmas custom, with its familiar symbol and meaning, has evolved over time. The Three Wise Men of the East were the first religious figures to worship Jesus Christ and therefore particularly respected by many Christians. But what is the history of the Three Wise Men and the significance of their gifts? This article provides facts and information about the history of the Three Wise Men as a familiar symbol of our Christmas today.  

The History of the Three Wise Men
The three Wise Men of the East, also called the Magi, are featured in the Bible story of the Nativity. The story of the Three Wise Men are detailed in the Bible in Matthew 2, 1-5; 7-15; 19-23:

Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.

When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled. And when he had gathered the chief priests and scribes of the people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born. They said, In Bethlehem of Judea.

Then Herod privily called the wise men, and inquired of them what time the star appeared. He sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Search diligently for the child; and when ye have found him, bring me word, that I may come and worship him also.

The wise men departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it stood over where the child was. They rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

And when they saw the child with Mary his mother, they worshipped him: and they opened their treasures, and presented unto him gifts, gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.

3 Wise Men
Picture of the Three Wise Men

The History of the Three Wise Men - Where did they come from?
The 'Three Wise Men of the East' were believed by most experts to have come from from Persia. The Yemen is also a possibility, as this is the only place where myrrh was found. The Three Wise Men are most typically depicted wearing Persian clothes in Christian art as illustrated in the above picture.

What were the names of the Three Wise Men?
The names of the 'Three Wise Men' are not mentioned in the Bible. They are referred to by a variety of different names but in the traditional Western Christian church they are commonly known as Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar. These names were detailed in an early 6th century Greek manuscript in Alexandria.

The History of the Three Wise Men - Who were the Three Wise Men?
As previously stated the Three Wise Men of the East were the first to worship Jesus Christ and therefore particularly respected by many Christians. But who were the Three Wise Men? The 'Three Wise Men of the East' are most commonly believed to be Magi. The Greek word 'magi' is usually translated as "wise men." They had identified a star which they believed signified the birth of the King of the Jews. The Three Wise Men were probably deemed to be "astronomers" or "astrologers". The ancients believed that astronomical phenomena were connected to important terrestrial events.

The History of the Three Wise Men - Were they Kings?
Were the Three Wise Men kings? The identification of the Three Wise Men as kings is linked to Old Testament prophesies (Isaiah 60:3, Psalm 72:10, and Psalm 68:29) that state that the Messiah would be worshipped by kings. The gifts that they presented were extremely valuable. The gifts were fit for a king and to be given by kings. The above picture depicts the Three Wise Men, one of whom is kneeling before the infant Jesus. The gesture of kneeling has had an important effect on Christian religious practices which shows great respect. Previously, both Jewish and Roman traditions had viewed kneeling as undignified. Only in other cultures, such as Persian, was this gesture typically used when venerating a king.

The Gifts given by the Three Wise Men
The Three Wise Men presented the infant Jesus with three gifts which were fit for a king.

  • Gold as a symbol of kingship on earth, symbolizing virtue
  • Myrrh (an embalming oil) was used as an anointing oil and as a symbol of suffering
  • Frankincense was used as a perfume, symbolizing prayer and the priesthood

Three Wise Men
Christmas is celebrated worldwide, throughout the Christian population of approximately 2275 million people, but is also celebrated by many non-Christians as a secular, cultural festival. Customs and traditions are symbolized by familiar symbols and icons, such as the Three Wise Men,  have come to represent the spirit and meaning of this special time of the year.

Three Wise Men

Three Wise Men

  • Three Wise Men
  • The history, meaning and origin of this familiar symbol
  • Old Customs, Symbols and Traditions
  • Meaning and origin of traditional customs
  • History, Facts and information about customs, symbols and traditions
  • Meaning, history and origin of traditional symbols
  • A Religious Christian meaning, Pagan origins or a Modern custom?
  • Three Wise Men

Three Wise Men

"Merry Christmas, have a happy and prosperous New Year!"

Three Wise Men - Symbol and Meaning - Customs - Custom - Chrismas - Xmas - History - Traditional - Meanings - Activities - World - Customs - Custom - Traditional - Traditions - Symbol - Symbols - Symbolic - Facts - Info - Information - Meanings - Meaning - Origin - Origins - Significance -  Religious - Christian - Pagan - Practice - Practices - Facts - Information - Info - Symbol and Meaning - Customs - Custom - Chrismas - Xmas - History - Traditional - Meanings - Activities - World - Customs - Custom - Traditional - Traditions - Symbol - Symbols - Symbolic - Facts - Info - Information - Meanings - Meaning - Origin - Origins - Significance -  Religious - Christian - Pagan - Practice - Practices - Facts - Information - Info - Three Wise Men - Christmas gift - ipad mini 2 4 - xbox live 720 360 games - iphone 5 - kindle fire hd playstation network 3

Merry Christmas Home
2012 www.reindeerland.org

Cookie Policy

Site by Marcus Tidmarsh

Google+